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Facebook reportedly courting help from Winklevoss twins for its cryptocurrency

10 0 04 Jun 2019

Facebook reportedly courting help from Winklevoss twins for its cryptocurrency

As Facebook continues to poke around at the possibility of creating its own digital currency, it’s created the possibility for the unlikeliest of reunions. According to the Financial Times, the social networking giant has held talks with the Winklevoss twins …

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A cryptocurrency stealing app found on Google Play was downloaded over a thousand times

9 0 04 Jun 2019

Researchers have located two apps impersonating as cryptocurrency apps on Android’s application store, Google Play, which they say were created to trick individuals into transforming over their passwords. Their goal was to take cryptocurrency, the scientists said.

Police stopped a McDonalds in Scotland from selling milkshakes near a Nigel Farage rally to avoid further instances of far-right activists being doused in them

8 0 19 May 2019

nigel farage brexitBrexit Party leader Nigel Farage with an ice cream in Canvey Island while on the European Election campaign trail.Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images

Police requested that a McDonald’s in Scotland stop selling milkshakes while Nigel Farage, the leader of Britain’s Brexit Party, was in Edinburgh for a campaigning event ahead of upcoming European elections, according to CNN.

Authorities were trying to prevent protesters from potentially using milkshakes to douse Farage, in the wake of a recent trend in Britain in which opponents have dumped milkshakes on far-right activists.

 

The trend started in early May when a viral video circulated, showing a protester dumping a milkshake on far-right activist Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, who also goes by Tommy Robinson. He was doused in another milkshake just days later at another event. 

Protesters also tried to douse Carl Benjamin, another far-right activist and candidate of the UK Independence Party, on a different occasion, though they missed.

Fellow fast-food chain Burger King also jumped in on the action, taking to Twitter to poke fun at the situation. The brand later noted they were not endorsing violence.

 

The Brexit Party, created by Farage just weeks ago, is projected to win the most seats in the upcoming European elections, which could potentially lead to the downfall of Britain’s Conservative Party.

Police have requested that a Scotland…

Police stopped a McDonald’s in Scotland from selling milkshakes near a Nigel Farage rally to avoid further instances of far-right activists being doused in them

Brexit,McDonald’s,Nigel Farage,Britain

Police stopped a McDonald’s in Scotland from selling milkshakes near a Nigel Farage rally to avoid further instances of far-right activists being doused in them

2019-05-18T23:09:51+02:00

2019-05-18T21:34:34+02:00

2019-05-18T23:09:54+02:00

https://static5.businessinsider.de/image/5ce074ddf067177f997bb8d7-500-250/police-stopped-a-mcdonalds-in-scotland-from-selling-milkshakes-near-a-nigel-farage-rally-to-avoid-further-instances-of-far-right-activists-being-doused-in-them.jpg

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Police have requested that a Scotland McDonald’s stop selling milkshakes while Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage was in Edinburgh for a campaigning event, according to CNN.
They made the request to prevent protesters from taking part in a trend that has Britain’s far-right activists being dunked with milkshakes by opponents.
The Brexit Party is projected to win the upcoming European elections.
Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Police requested that a McDonald’s in Scotland stop selling milkshakes while Nigel Farage, the leader of Britain’s Brexit Party, was in Edinburgh for a campaigning event ahead of upcoming European elections, according to CNN.
Authorities were trying to prevent protesters from potentially using milkshakes to douse Farage, in the wake of a recent trend in Britain in which opponents have dumped milkshakes on far-right activists.
Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1129486192595079168?undefined=twsrc%5Etfw The McDonald’s next to the Farage demo. Someone clearly got wind. pic.twitter.com/kHETQ66TOq
 
The trend started in early May when a viral video circulated, showing a protester dumping a milkshake on far-right activist Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, who also goes by Tommy Robinson. He was doused in another milkshake just days later at another event. 
Protesters also tried to douse Carl Benjamin, another far-right activist and candidate of the UK Independence Party, on a different occasion, though they missed.
Fellow fast-food chain Burger King also jumped in on the action, taking to Twitter to poke fun at the situation. The brand later noted they were not endorsing violence.
Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1129815064431742976?undefined=twsrc%5Etfw We’d never endorse violence – or wasting our delicious milkshakes! So enjoy the weekend and please drink responsibly people. 🍔👑
 
The Brexit Party, created by Farage just weeks ago, is projected to win the most seats in the upcoming European elections, which could potentially lead to the downfall of Britain’s Conservative Party.

international

Police have requested that a Scotland…

Police stopped a McDonald’s in Scotland from selling milkshakes near a Nigel Farage rally to avoid further instances of far-right activists being doused in them

Brexit,McDonald’s,Nigel Farage,Britain

Police stopped a McDonald’s in Scotland from selling milkshakes near a Nigel Farage rally to avoid further instances of far-right activists being doused in them

2019-05-18T23:09:51+02:00

2019-05-18T23:09:54+02:00

https://static5.businessinsider.de/image/5ce074ddf067177f997bb8d7-500-250/police-stopped-a-mcdonalds-in-scotland-from-selling-milkshakes-near-a-nigel-farage-rally-to-avoid-further-instances-of-far-right-activists-being-doused-in-them.jpg

BusinessInsiderDe



Police have requested that a Scotland McDonald’s stop selling milkshakes while Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage was in Edinburgh for a campaigning event, according to CNN.
They made the request to prevent protesters from taking part in a trend that has Britain’s far-right activists being dunked with milkshakes by opponents.
The Brexit Party is projected to win the upcoming European elections.
Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Police requested that a McDonald’s in Scotland stop selling milkshakes while Nigel Farage, the leader of Britain’s Brexit Party, was in Edinburgh for a campaigning event ahead of upcoming European elections, according to CNN.
Authorities were trying to prevent protesters from potentially using milkshakes to douse Farage, in the wake of a recent trend in Britain in which opponents have dumped milkshakes on far-right activists.
Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1129486192595079168?undefined=twsrc%5Etfw The McDonald’s next to the Farage demo. Someone clearly got wind. pic.twitter.com/kHETQ66TOq
 
The trend started in early May when a viral video circulated, showing a protester dumping a milkshake on far-right activist Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, who also goes by Tommy Robinson. He was doused in another milkshake just days later at another event. 
Protesters also tried to douse Carl Benjamin, another far-right activist and candidate of the UK Independence Party, on a different occasion, though they missed.
Fellow fast-food chain Burger King also jumped in on the action, taking to Twitter to poke fun at the situation. The brand later noted they were not endorsing violence.
Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1129815064431742976?undefined=twsrc%5Etfw We’d never endorse violence – or wasting our delicious milkshakes! So enjoy the weekend and please drink responsibly people. 🍔👑
 
The Brexit Party, created by Farage just weeks ago, is projected to win the most seats in the upcoming European elections, which could potentially lead to the downfall of Britain’s Conservative Party.

international

2 wild interviews show how AG Barr is behaving more like Trumps personal defense lawyer than the countrys top law enforcement officer

12 0 19 May 2019

william barr 2Attorney General William Barr.AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Analysis bannerBusiness Insider

  • Attorney General William Barr defended President Donald Trump’s characterization of the Russia investigation as a “witch hunt” in a new Fox News interview this week.
  • When host Bill Hemmer asked Barr if he’s comfortable labeling the Russia probe a witch hunt, Barr replied, “I use what words I use … but I think if I had been falsely accused, I’d be comfortable saying it was a witch hunt.”
  • Barr also told Fox News he’s investing significant resources into finding out if “government officials abused their power and put their thumb on the scale” when launching the Russia probe.
  • In a separate interview with the Wall Street Journal, Barr doubled down on his previous claims that the FBI was “spying” on the Trump campaign during the 2016 election. “Government power was used to spy on American citizens,” Barr said.
  • The interviews added to a growing list of examples that critics say are demonstrative of how Barr is acting more as the president’s defense lawyer than as the country’s top law enforcement officer.
  • Read more stories like this on Business Insider’s homepage.

Since he took over as attorney general, William Barr has been at the center of controversy after controversy when it related to his oversight of the FBI’s Russia investigation, the special counsel Robert Mueller, and his repeated efforts to shield President Donald Trump from public scrutiny.

This week marked another flashpoint, when Barr made some telling comments to Fox News and The Wall Street Journal, many of which fueled speculation that he is acting more as the president’s defense lawyer than as the top law enforcement officer in the US.

In the new interview with Fox News, Barr gave a full throated defense of the president’s baseless accusation that Mueller was on a “witch hunt” against him and his associates.

Read more: People tied to Trump and Congress may have affected Flynn’s ‘willingness to cooperate’ with Mueller, according to a new court filing

During his confirmation hearing earlier this year, Barr told the Senate Judiciary Committee he trusted Mueller’s judgment and added that he did not believe the special counsel would be involved in a witch hunt.

But the attorney general changed his tune in a big way this week, telling Fox News host Bill Hemmer that Trump was justified in characterizing the investigation as a politically motivated fishing expedition.

“He was saying he was innocent and that he was being falsely accused,” Barr said of the president. “And if you’re falsely accused, you would think that something was a witch hunt.”

Barr also told Fox he’s investing significant resources into finding out whether “government officials abused their power and put their thumb on the scale” when launching the Russia probe. “A lot of the answers have been inadequate and some of the explanations I’ve gotten don’t hang together,” he said. “In a sense, I have more questions today than I did when I first started.”

Read more: Barr and Pelosi reportedly joked about whether she brought handcuffs to arrest him after Democrats’ contempt vote

Barr added that Trump has been investigated for “conspiring with the Russians, and we now know that was simply false.” When Hemmer asked Barr if he’s comfortable labeling the Russia probe a witch hunt, Barr replied, “I use what words I use … but I think if I had been falsely accused, I’d be comfortable saying it was a witch hunt.”

Meanwhile, in a separate interview with The Journal, Barr doubled down on his previous claims that the FBI was “spying” on the Trump campaign during the 2016 election.

“Government power was used to spy on American citizens,” Barr told The Journal. “I can’t imagine any world where we wouldn’t take a look and make sure that was done properly.”

There is no evidence to date that the FBI or the Justice Department broke protocol when conducting the Russia investigation or seeking a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant against Trump aide Carter Page.

But there are now three separate entities who have been tasked with investigating alleged misconduct and corruption at both agencies: the DOJ’s Office of the Inspector General, and US attorneys John Huber and John Durham.

Read more: Trump’s strategy of stonewalling Congress is facing a huge legal test

FILE - In this March 24, 2019, file photo, special counsel Robert Mueller walks past the White House after attending services at St. John's Episcopal Church, in Washington. For two years, the nation watched and waited as Mueller investigated President Donald Trump and his campaign for potential collusion with Russia and obstruction of justice. The release of Mueller’s report last month provided a long-awaited moment of closure for many _ and an utterly unsatisfying finale for plenty of others. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)FILE – In this March 24, 2019, file photo, special counsel Robert Mueller walks past the White House after attending services at St. John’s Episcopal Church, in Washington. For two years, the nation watched and waited as Mueller investigated President Donald Trump and his campaign for potential collusion with Russia and obstruction of justice. The release of Mueller’s report last month provided a long-awaited moment of closure for many _ and an utterly unsatisfying finale for plenty of others. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)Associated Press

How the Russia investigation started, and how Barr has twisted Mueller’s findings

In July 2016, WikiLeaks published the first of several troves of hacked Democratic National Committee emails that had been stolen by the Russian government.

Following the leak, the Australian government notified the FBI that George Papadopoulos, then a Trump campaign foreign policy aide, boasted a few months earlier to an Australian diplomat that Russia had dirt on the Hillary Clinton campaign in the form of “thousands” of emails.

The tip prompted the FBI to open an inquiry into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and whether anyone associated with the Trump campaign secretly worked with Moscow to help tilt the race in his favor.

Read more: The FBI’s former top lawyer said Mueller’s obstruction findings are ‘alarming’ and show a ‘pattern of corruption’

Meanwhile, when Trump fired FBI director James Comey in May 2017, the move sparked significant concern among senior officials that the president was working on behalf of the Russian government. After Comey’s firing, the bureau also launched a criminal investigation into whether Trump obstructed justice.

Mueller’s final report said the Russia investigation did not establish that members of the campaign coordinated with Russia during the election.

But prosecutors prefaced that statement with a notable caveat: “The investigation established that the Russian government perceived it would benefit from a Trump presidency and worked to secure that outcome, and … the Campaign expected it would benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts.”

The special counsel declined to make a “traditional prosecutorial judgment” on whether Trump obstructed justice, citing DOJ guidelines that say a sitting president cannot be indicted.

Read more: Trump just walked back his claim that there was ‘no obstruction’ in the Mueller probe in a big way

But his team laid out an extensive roadmap of evidence against Trump, adding, “If we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state … Based on the facts and the applicable legal standards, however, we are unable to reach that judgment.”

Instead of releasing Mueller’s report when it was submitted to him, Barr opted to put out a four-page summary of his “principal conclusions” about Mueller’s findings. The letter highlighted Mueller’s conclusion that there wasn’t enough evidence to bring a criminal conspiracy charge against Trump or anyone on his campaign. It also said Mueller declined to make a judgment on the obstruction question.

The letter left out the extensive details Mueller laid out on the myriad contacts Trump associates had with Russians, and Trump’s concerted efforts to hamper the resulting investigation.

Mueller indicated in the report that it was up to Congress to investigate the obstruction question further. But Barr took it upon himself to announce, before the report was released, that Trump had not committed an obstruction offense.

Earlier this month, it surfaced that Mueller sent two letters to Barr expressing frustration with the way the attorney general handled the report. One was sent on March 25, one day after Barr released his summary of the report. The second was sent on March 27.

In the March 27 letter, Mueller said he was dissatisfied with the fact that Barr’s letter “did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance of this Office’s work and conclusions.”

“We communicated that concern to the Department on the morning of March 25,” Mueller continued. “There is now public confusion about critical aspects of the results of our investigation. This threatens to undermine a central purpose for which the Department appointed the Special Counsel: to assure full public confidence in the outcome of the investigations.”

Apple CEO Tim Cook urges college grads to push back against algorithms that promote the things you already know, believe, or like

8 0 19 May 2019

Tim CookGetty

  • Apple CEO Tim Cook gave the commencement speech at Tulane University on Saturday, during which he encouraged students to listen to others and remain open to seeing the world in a different way.
  • Cook encouraged students to pay attention to “what we owe one another” and touched on the importance of addressing climate change.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Since being named CEO of Apple in 2011, Tim Cook has made it a point to ensure that Apple leaves its mark on the world in ways that stretch far beyond the company’s business practices. Under his leadership, for example, Apple has boosted its sustainability efforts and now runs on 100% renewable energy.

When addressing graduates at Tulane University on Saturday, Cook encouraged students to similarly tackle big-picture problems and consider “what we owe” to one another.

“In a world where we obsessively document our own lives, most of us don’t pay nearly enough attention to what we owe one another,” Cook said. “It’s about recognizing that human civilization began when we realized that we could do more together.”

Cook stressed the importance of listening to others and being open to seeing the world in a different way. In what could have been a reference to Facebook, which has been under scrutiny in recent years over how it chooses the information displayed in its News Feed, the Apple CEO urged students to open their eyes.

“Today, certain algorithms pull you toward the things you already know, believe, or like, and they push away everything else,” he said. “Push back. It shouldn’t be this way. But in 2019 opening your eyes and seeing things in a new way can be a revolutionary act.”

Facebook has been criticized for being an echo chamber in the past, especially when the company changed its algorithm in 2016 to focus more closely on updates from friends. That lends itself to the argument that Facebook creates a “filter bubble” in which users are only exposed to the content and ideas that align with their own beliefs. 

Apple has notably pursued human curation for its Apple News app.

Cook has been vocal about his stance on the importance of climate change, and he touched on this topic again in his commencement speech, urging graduates to “look for those who have the most to lose” when solving problems.

“When you do that, the political noise dies down and you can feel your feet firmly planted on solid ground,” he said. “After all, we don’t build monuments to trolls, and we’re not going to start now.”

Cook admitted that this is something his generation needs to get better at.

“In some important ways, my generation has failed you in this regard,” he said. “We spend too much time debating. We’ve been too focused on the fight and not focused enough on progress.”

Watch the video of Cook’s full speech below. 

 

San Franciscos homeless population has swelled by 17% in two years, with most of that growth coming from people living out of their cars

9 0 19 May 2019

san francisco homeless app concrn 57Melia Robinson/Business Insider

  • A preliminary one-night tally of San Francisco’s homeless population taken in January was cast at 8,011, up 17% from two years ago according to the San Francisco Chronicle.
  • A key reason for the increase is a 45% rise in people in the city living out of vehicles, such as RVs.
  • The increased street count shows how San Francisco’s long-standing homelessness crisis is worsening.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

San Francisco has long dealt with a homelessness crisis, exacerbated in part by the region’s technology boom and housing shortage, but a new street count of the city’s homeless shows just how bad it’s gotten.

An early summary of a one-night tally taken in January cast San Francisco’s homeless population at 8,011 — up 17% from two years ago, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. A key cause of the increase is a 45% rise in people living out of vehicles in the last two years.

But even the 8,011 count may not tell the whole story.

Federal guidelines are used to calculate these preliminary totals, not city guidelines, which include more nuanced classifications of homelessness, according to the Chronicle. So the actual count will likely be higher — like it was in 2017 when a preliminary street count of 6,858 preceded a more complete total of 7,499.

There were, however, a few positive changes in the preliminary report — the number of homeless veterans decreased by 14% and the number of homeless youths went down by 10%.

Nevertheless, the data is a grim reminder that San Francisco’s homelessness problem is not improving, especially at a time when another wave of wealth is expected to soon wash over the city. Multiple tech companies, including ride-sharing giant Uber, are gearing up for their 2019 IPOs, which could potentially result in a widened existing income inequity gap.

San Francisco has drummed up a number of solutions in recent years to battle its homelessness crisis. A bill passed in November, Proposition C, is expected to raise $300 million for homeless programs by raising taxes on tech companies. And plans for a 200-bed homeless shelter is in talks to go up along the city’s Embarcadero, angering some nearby neighbors who are protesting its construction. 

The state of California as a whole is also grappling with a homelessness problem — 24% of the total homeless population in the US lives in California.

A preliminary one-night tally of San…

San Francisco’s homeless population has swelled by 17% in two years, with most of that growth coming from people living out of their cars

San Francisco,Homelessness,Silicon Valley,Tech,Housing Shortage

San Francisco’s homeless population has swelled by 17% in two years, with most of that growth coming from people living out of their cars

2019-05-18T20:28:55+02:00

2019-05-18T17:12:11+02:00

2019-05-18T20:29:01+02:00

https://static4.businessinsider.de/image/5ce04f24e9f08a7972231dea-500-250/san-franciscos-homeless-population-has-swelled-by-17-in-two-years-with-most-of-that-growth-coming-from-people-living-out-of-their-cars.jpg

BusinessInsiderDe



A preliminary one-night tally of San Francisco’s homeless population taken in January was cast at 8,011, up 17% from two years ago according to the San Francisco Chronicle.
A key reason for the increase is a 45% rise in people in the city living out of vehicles, such as RVs.
The increased street count shows how San Francisco’s long-standing homelessness crisis is worsening.
Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

San Francisco has long dealt with a homelessness crisis, exacerbated in part by the region’s technology boom and housing shortage, but a new street count of the city’s homeless shows just how bad it’s gotten.
An early summary of a one-night tally taken in January cast San Francisco’s homeless population at 8,011 — up 17% from two years ago, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. A key cause of the increase is a 45% rise in people living out of vehicles in the last two years.
But even the 8,011 count may not tell the whole story.
Federal guidelines are used to calculate these preliminary totals, not city guidelines, which include more nuanced classifications of homelessness, according to the Chronicle. So the actual count will likely be higher — like it was in 2017 when a preliminary street count of 6,858 preceded a more complete total of 7,499.
There were, however, a few positive changes in the preliminary report — the number of homeless veterans decreased by 14% and the number of homeless youths went down by 10%.
Nevertheless, the data is a grim reminder that San Francisco’s homelessness problem is not improving, especially at a time when another wave of wealth is expected to soon wash over the city. Multiple tech companies, including ride-sharing giant Uber, are gearing up for their 2019 IPOs, which could potentially result in a widened existing income inequity gap.
San Francisco has drummed up a number of solutions in recent years to battle its homelessness crisis. A bill passed in November, Proposition C, is expected to raise $300 million for homeless programs by raising taxes on tech companies. And plans for a 200-bed homeless shelter is in talks to go up along the city’s Embarcadero, angering some nearby neighbors who are protesting its construction. 
The state of California as a whole is also grappling with a homelessness problem — 24% of the total homeless population in the US lives in California.

international

A preliminary one-night tally of San…

San Francisco’s homeless population has swelled by 17% in two years, with most of that growth coming from people living out of their cars

San Francisco,Homelessness,Silicon Valley,Tech,Housing Shortage

San Francisco’s homeless population has swelled by 17% in two years, with most of that growth coming from people living out of their cars

2019-05-18T20:28:55+02:00

2019-05-18T20:29:01+02:00

https://static4.businessinsider.de/image/5ce04f24e9f08a7972231dea-500-250/san-franciscos-homeless-population-has-swelled-by-17-in-two-years-with-most-of-that-growth-coming-from-people-living-out-of-their-cars.jpg

BusinessInsiderDe



A preliminary one-night tally of San Francisco’s homeless population taken in January was cast at 8,011, up 17% from two years ago according to the San Francisco Chronicle.
A key reason for the increase is a 45% rise in people in the city living out of vehicles, such as RVs.
The increased street count shows how San Francisco’s long-standing homelessness crisis is worsening.
Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

San Francisco has long dealt with a homelessness crisis, exacerbated in part by the region’s technology boom and housing shortage, but a new street count of the city’s homeless shows just how bad it’s gotten.
An early summary of a one-night tally taken in January cast San Francisco’s homeless population at 8,011 — up 17% from two years ago, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. A key cause of the increase is a 45% rise in people living out of vehicles in the last two years.
But even the 8,011 count may not tell the whole story.
Federal guidelines are used to calculate these preliminary totals, not city guidelines, which include more nuanced classifications of homelessness, according to the Chronicle. So the actual count will likely be higher — like it was in 2017 when a preliminary street count of 6,858 preceded a more complete total of 7,499.
There were, however, a few positive changes in the preliminary report — the number of homeless veterans decreased by 14% and the number of homeless youths went down by 10%.
Nevertheless, the data is a grim reminder that San Francisco’s homelessness problem is not improving, especially at a time when another wave of wealth is expected to soon wash over the city. Multiple tech companies, including ride-sharing giant Uber, are gearing up for their 2019 IPOs, which could potentially result in a widened existing income inequity gap.
San Francisco has drummed up a number of solutions in recent years to battle its homelessness crisis. A bill passed in November, Proposition C, is expected to raise $300 million for homeless programs by raising taxes on tech companies. And plans for a 200-bed homeless shelter is in talks to go up along the city’s Embarcadero, angering some nearby neighbors who are protesting its construction. 
The state of California as a whole is also grappling with a homelessness problem — 24% of the total homeless population in the US lives in California.

international

Trumps video slamming Bill de Blasios presidential run from Air Force One is sparking ethics concerns

9 0 19 May 2019

donald trump air force onePresident Donald Trump steps off Air Force One upon arrival at Miami International Airport in Miami on April 16, 2018.MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

  • President Donald Trump has sparked ethics concerns after he posted a video mocking New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s 2020 presidential campaign that appeared to be filmed on Air Force One.
  • The presidential seal is in clear view during the video and taxpayers foot the bill for the cost of Air Force One trips, which a top political watchdog group said Trump should refund.
  • Top administration officials have sparked numerous ethics concerns before, and Trump’s campaign for next year’s election could further muddy the waters between his activity as a candidate and president. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump posted a video last week to mock New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s newly launched presidential campaign.

Sitting aboard Air Force One with the presidential seal visible on a window cover, Trump said to the camera: “If you like high taxes and if you like crime, you can vote for him. But most people aren’t into that.”

The video is Trump’s latest incident to blur the lines between his campaign efforts and the resources available to him as president. Political ethics watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington tweeted after the video was posted that it presented a possible campaig- finance violation.

“Nice political ad filmed on Air Force One,” the group said. “You now legally need to reimburse the Treasury for the use of Air Force One on a political trip. Since you had no problem tweeting out the video, you should have no problem tweeting out the receipts when you reimburse the taxpayers.” 

Read more: Bill de Blasio’s presidential campaign announcement was met with intense anger and mockery over New York’s failing public transit system

Business Insider previously reported that it costs about $200,000 per hour to operate Air Force One for a presidential trip.

Trump tweeted the video Thursday evening while on his way to a fundraiser in New York.

Paul S. Ryan, vice president of policy and litigation at the nonpartisan watchdog group Common Cause, told The Washington Post that Trump filming the video on Air Force One was “entirely inappropriate.”

“It is against historical norms for a president to be campaigning from Air Force One,” Ryan told The Post. “Most presidents have had enough respect for the office to try to separate campaigning from formal duties. Donald Trump is not such a president.”

The president’s time in office has marked an uptick in complaints about potential violations of the Hatch Act, which forbids executive branch officials from participating in certain political activities.

Though the president and vice president are exempt from the Hatch Act, a number of Trump’s associates, such as counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway, have been investigated by the Office of Special Counsel.

“Senior administration has repeatedly violated the Hatch Act, so they’ve gotten reprimands from the Office of Special Counsel, but they keep doing it over and over again,” Ryan said. “The problem is that the president doesn’t care about ethics laws.”

The rise and fall of Amtrak, which has been losing money since 1971

9 0 19 May 2019

Amtrak train Columbia River WashingtonWolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

  • The US has long lagged behind other countries when it comes to passenger rail.
  • In 1971, Amtrak was formed from 20 other ailing passenger railroads.
  • The railroad has expanded to cover 21,000 miles on 33 routes — but has never escaped financial trouble.

150 years ago this month, the United States completed one of the most impressive engineering feats of the time (and to this day): a single railroad, connecting sea to shining sea.

In the decades following, American trains — carrying both freight and passengers — would flourish. Railroads shuttled passengers between thriving urban centers, and streetcars criss-crossed towns around the country. By 1916, 98% of all intercity travel took place on rail, according to US Census Bureau statistics.

But by the 1940s, American’s insatiable appetite for automobiles had begun to take shape.

Railroads’ share of the travel market began to shrink drastically as the government began to incentivize road building and airport investments. And by 1970, the last year that America’s rail network was privately controlled in its entirety, the total miles traveled on trains had fallen to less than 100,000.

That’s when the federal government stepped in to create what would become known as Amtrak. Here’s the history of America’s passenger railroad, which has managed to lose money in every single one of the 48 years since its inception.

The US has long lagged behind other countries…

The rise and fall of Amtrak, which has been losing money since 1971

Features,Amtrak,Trains,BITranspo

The rise and fall of Amtrak, which has been losing money since 1971

2019-05-18T15:15:00+02:00

2019-05-17T21:20:40+02:00

2019-05-18T15:16:10+02:00

https://static4.businessinsider.de/image/5cdf3626e9f08a73d015d8f9-500-250/the-rise-and-fall-of-amtrak-which-has-been-losing-money-since-1971.jpg

BusinessInsiderDe



The US has long lagged behind other countries when it comes to passenger rail.
In 1971, Amtrak was formed from 20 other ailing passenger railroads.
The railroad has expanded to cover 21,000 miles on 33 routes — but has never escaped financial trouble.

150 years ago this month, the United States completed one of the most impressive engineering feats of the time (and to this day): a single railroad, connecting sea to shining sea.
In the decades following, American trains — carrying both freight and passengers — would flourish. Railroads shuttled passengers between thriving urban centers, and streetcars criss-crossed towns around the country. By 1916, 98% of all intercity travel took place on rail, according to US Census Bureau statistics.
But by the 1940s, American’s insatiable appetite for automobiles had begun to take shape.
Railroads’ share of the travel market began to shrink drastically as the government began to incentivize road building and airport investments. And by 1970, the last year that America’s rail network was privately controlled in its entirety, the total miles traveled on trains had fallen to less than 100,000.
That’s when the federal government stepped in to create what would become known as Amtrak. Here’s the history of America’s passenger railroad, which has managed to lose money in every single one of the 48 years since its inception.

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The US has long lagged behind other countries…

The rise and fall of Amtrak, which has been losing money since 1971

Features,Amtrak,Trains,BITranspo

The rise and fall of Amtrak, which has been losing money since 1971

2019-05-18T15:15:00+02:00

2019-05-18T15:16:10+02:00

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The US has long lagged behind other countries when it comes to passenger rail.
In 1971, Amtrak was formed from 20 other ailing passenger railroads.
The railroad has expanded to cover 21,000 miles on 33 routes — but has never escaped financial trouble.

150 years ago this month, the United States completed one of the most impressive engineering feats of the time (and to this day): a single railroad, connecting sea to shining sea.
In the decades following, American trains — carrying both freight and passengers — would flourish. Railroads shuttled passengers between thriving urban centers, and streetcars criss-crossed towns around the country. By 1916, 98% of all intercity travel took place on rail, according to US Census Bureau statistics.
But by the 1940s, American’s insatiable appetite for automobiles had begun to take shape.
Railroads’ share of the travel market began to shrink drastically as the government began to incentivize road building and airport investments. And by 1970, the last year that America’s rail network was privately controlled in its entirety, the total miles traveled on trains had fallen to less than 100,000.
That’s when the federal government stepped in to create what would become known as Amtrak. Here’s the history of America’s passenger railroad, which has managed to lose money in every single one of the 48 years since its inception.

international

Someone hacked into the USGA database to post some unflattering fake golf scores on Trumps account

10 0 19 May 2019

trump golfPresident Donald Trump plays a round of golf on the Trump Turnberry resort in South Ayrshire.Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images

Someone appears to have hacked into the USGA-administered GHIN handicap system and posted some unflattering golf scores to President Trump’s account, Golfweek reported.

The recorded scores were 101, 100, 108, and 102. The courses used were Trump National New York (100 and 101), Trump International in West Palm Beach (108), and the Cochise Course at Desert Mountain in Scottsdale, Arizona, according to Golfweek.

“We have become aware of reports in the media questioning recent scores posted on President Trump’s GHIN account. As we dug into the data it appears someone has erroneously posted a number of scores on behalf of the GHIN user,” Craig Annis, the USGA’s managing director of communications, told Golfweek in a statement.

Annis added that the USGA is taking action to remove the scores and find the origin of the issue.

The scores are likely not authentic, as Trump was traveling, not playing golf, on Friday, the day the scores were released.

The posting of these scores came two days after Trump was recorded earning an impressive golf score on the USGA’s score-tracking service, claiming to have shot a 68. It was later deleted.

As INSIDER’S Tyler Lauletta previously reported, the GHIN database is not particularly secure, which makes it possible someone else entered both the suspiciously impressive and the less flattering scores — as either a mistake or a prank. 

Many were skeptical of the 68 score, particularly because Trump has a reputation for cheating on the golf course.

Read more: Trump accused of taking another player’s ball to cheat and win a championship at one of his golf clubs

“He cheats like hell. So I don’t quite know how he is in business. They say that if you cheat at golf, you cheat at business,” LPGA golfer Suzann Pettersen told a Norwegian newspaper in 2018. “He always says he is the world’s best putter. But in all the times I’ve played him, he’s never come close to breaking 80. But what’s strange is that every time I talk to him, he says he just golfed a 69, or that he set a new course record or won a club championship someplace.” 

The White House and USGA did not immediately respond for comment.

A Republican congressman says Trump has engaged in impeachable conduct

8 0 19 May 2019

justin amashIn this July 24, 2103 file photo, Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington.Associated Press/J. Scott Applewhite

  • Republican Rep. Justin Amash called for President Donald Trump’s impeachment on Saturday and accused Attorney General William Barr of misrepresenting the Russia investigation findings.
  • Amash tweeted that he believes Trump’s actions “meet the threshold for impeachment” and he likely would have been indicted on obstruction of justice charges had he not been president.
  • Amash added that few members of Congress have even read the special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, merely echoing the party line in their defenses and criticisms of Trump.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Republican Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan laid out in a stunning Twitter thread posted Saturday why he believes President Donald Trump “engaged in impeachable conduct,” and Attorney General William Barr “deliberately misrepresented” the findings of the special counsel’s Russia investigation.

Amash tweeted that he came to the conclusions “only after having read [Robert] Mueller’s redacted report carefully and completely” and reviewing relevant testimony and materials. He added that “few members of Congress have read the report.”

Amash, a frequent Trump critic, is the first Republican lawmaker to call for Trump’s impeachment. Though a number of Democrats have also called for impeachment, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her fellow Democratic leaders have been reluctant to make a move.

Republicans, meanwhile, have largely defended Trump’s conduct and even echoed Trump’s claims that the Russia investigation was a “witch hunt” launched on unfair premises.

Read more: 2 wild interviews show how AG Barr is behaving more like Trump’s personal defense lawyer than the country’s top law enforcement officer

 

But Amash said that despite Barr’s portrayal of the Mueller report, Trump’s actions “meet the threshold for impeachment” and he likely would have been indicted on obstruction of justice charges, had he not been president.

He added that he didn’t view a criminal indictment or conviction as necessary grounds for impeachment — more so “conduct that violates the public trust.”

“Impeachment, which is a special form of indictment, does not even require probable cause that a crime (e.g., obstruction of justice) has been committed; it simply requires a finding that an official has engaged in careless, abusive, corrupt, or otherwise dishonorable conduct,” he said.

He continued: “While impeachment should be undertaken only in extraordinary circumstances, the risk we face in an environment of extreme partisanship is not that Congress will employ it as a remedy too often but rather that Congress will employ it so rarely that it cannot deter misconduct.”